Tag Archives: Feminism

Virtual march helps people with disabilities join the Women’s March on Washington

Image: Vicky LEta/Mashable

Activism isn’t always accessible and the Women’s March on Washington is no exception.

For people who might not have the physical ability or stamina to join Saturday’s massive public protest, disability activists created the Disability March an online movement that allows people with disabilities and chronic illnesses to participate virtually in the event.

The Disability March organizers invite people living with disabilities to submit their names, photos and a statement on why they want to “march.” The images and text will be uploaded to the website in time for the Women’s March on Jan. 21, creating a virtual archive of people showing solidarity with the main event in Washington, D.C.

“I began to wonder about other ways to be visible, especially for our community, besides marching”

Sonya Huber, one of the organizers, was inspired to create the online movement after she realized attending the Women’s March wouldn’t be the best idea for her health. A disability rights activist and professor at Fairfield University in Connecticut, Huber lives with a few autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid disease and Hashimoto’s disease. She also experiences some mobility problems.

“The march, combined with the drive, would have done a number on my immune system at the beginning of a busy semester,” she told Mashable.

But Huber knew she wasn’t alone, and she wanted to do something to help broaden access to the march for her community.

“I began to wonder about other ways to be visible, especially for our community, besides marching even though the march will of course include many disabled people,” she said. “Since the disabled community is going to be so impacted by the Republican agenda, it seemed that giving people a platform to tell their individual stories was most appropriate.”

Image: Disability March

The Disability March is an all-volunteer effort, made for the disability community, by the disability community. It’s also an official co-sponsor of the Women’s March on Washington.

Huber said about 50 online “marchers” have signed up to participate in the virtual march so far, and she expects more people to submit their stories throughout the week.

Some images and testimonies of Disability March participants are already live on the movement’s website, but the bulk of photos and statements will be uploaded Friday and Saturday to coincide with the main march.

Disability March organizers are also coming up with activist-oriented tasks for participants, designed with various levels of ability and comfort in mind. While still in planning stages, the goal is to offer tangible actions for people to still make an impact.

“In keeping our whole community in mind, our vision for a just society will be more inclusive and our activism will be more effective.”

Huber hopes the online march will draw attention to the faces and stories of people who will be heavily affected by the Trump administration, especially the potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act and attacks on Medicaid.

“I hope that this small effort which rides the wave of so much other disability activism can help get the word out about the large number of people with invisible and visible disabilities who need an outlet for sharing their stories and who want to be active,” she said.

The Disability March also challenges other activist efforts to take inclusivity and different types of participation in social movements seriously.

“We are not a peripheral community,” Huber said. “In keeping our whole community in mind, our vision for a just society will be more inclusive and our activism will be more effective.”

If you want to join the Disability March, you can fill out the short online form here. The deadline for submissions is Friday, Jan. 20.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/01/18/disability-march-womens-march-on-washington/

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Virtual march helps people with disabilities join the Women’s March on Washington

Image: Vicky LEta/Mashable

Activism isn’t always accessible and the Women’s March on Washington is no exception.

For people who might not have the physical ability or stamina to join Saturday’s massive public protest, disability activists created the Disability March an online movement that allows people with disabilities and chronic illnesses to participate virtually in the event.

The Disability March organizers invite people living with disabilities to submit their names, photos and a statement on why they want to “march.” The images and text will be uploaded to the website in time for the Women’s March on Jan. 21, creating a virtual archive of people showing solidarity with the main event in Washington, D.C.

“I began to wonder about other ways to be visible, especially for our community, besides marching”

Sonya Huber, one of the organizers, was inspired to create the online movement after she realized attending the Women’s March wouldn’t be the best idea for her health. A disability rights activist and professor at Fairfield University in Connecticut, Huber lives with a few autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid disease and Hashimoto’s disease. She also experiences some mobility problems.

“The march, combined with the drive, would have done a number on my immune system at the beginning of a busy semester,” she told Mashable.

But Huber knew she wasn’t alone, and she wanted to do something to help broaden access to the march for her community.

“I began to wonder about other ways to be visible, especially for our community, besides marching even though the march will of course include many disabled people,” she said. “Since the disabled community is going to be so impacted by the Republican agenda, it seemed that giving people a platform to tell their individual stories was most appropriate.”

Image: Disability March

The Disability March is an all-volunteer effort, made for the disability community, by the disability community. It’s also an official co-sponsor of the Women’s March on Washington.

Huber said about 50 online “marchers” have signed up to participate in the virtual march so far, and she expects more people to submit their stories throughout the week.

Some images and testimonies of Disability March participants are already live on the movement’s website, but the bulk of photos and statements will be uploaded Friday and Saturday to coincide with the main march.

Disability March organizers are also coming up with activist-oriented tasks for participants, designed with various levels of ability and comfort in mind. While still in planning stages, the goal is to offer tangible actions for people to still make an impact.

“In keeping our whole community in mind, our vision for a just society will be more inclusive and our activism will be more effective.”

Huber hopes the online march will draw attention to the faces and stories of people who will be heavily affected by the Trump administration, especially the potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act and attacks on Medicaid.

“I hope that this small effort which rides the wave of so much other disability activism can help get the word out about the large number of people with invisible and visible disabilities who need an outlet for sharing their stories and who want to be active,” she said.

The Disability March also challenges other activist efforts to take inclusivity and different types of participation in social movements seriously.

“We are not a peripheral community,” Huber said. “In keeping our whole community in mind, our vision for a just society will be more inclusive and our activism will be more effective.”

If you want to join the Disability March, you can fill out the short online form here. The deadline for submissions is Friday, Jan. 20.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/01/18/disability-march-womens-march-on-washington/

READ MORE

8 Outdated, Horrid Rituals Women Are Still Subjected To All Over The World

Weddings, bat and bar mitzvahs, communions…they’re all ritual practices we’ve grown accustomed to.

Rituals are created by societies to establish a sense of community and oneness.

But not every ritual ends with a party and a cake. Even in 2016, there are still some cultures that continue to enforce ancient ceremonial practices — often at the expense, belittlement, and abuse of women.

Here are some of the most bizarre and horrific rituals performed on women to this day.

1. Force-feeding

Women in Mauritania are expected to be full-figured, so young women are force-fed a diet of 16,000 calories a day before their wedding. Young girls are overfed as children in preparation for this. Naturally, the practice comes with countless health problems down the line and can even lead to death from burst stomachs.

2. Crying marriages

Getty Images

In Southwest China’s Sichuan Province, the Tujia people practice a strange Qing Dynasty custom called “Zuo Tang” that forces brides to cry every night before their wedding for a whole month. After 10 days of crying alone, her mother is supposed to join. Ten days after that, her grandmother. Soon, aunts, female cousins, and sisters join the cry-fest until the wedding day.

3. Female circumcision

Women in the Sabiny tribe in Uganda are forced to have part of if not their ENTIRE clitoris removed as a symbol of achieving womanhood. The process has a high chance of causing death by infection, but to Sabiny women, it’s all part of an elaborate test to prove their loyalty to their men.

4. Kidnapping

Certain sects of the Romani people — otherwise known as Gypsies and largely concentrated in Europe — believe that if a man kidnaps a woman he likes for three to five days, he has every right to marry her.

5. Teeth chiseling

The women of the Mentawai Islands in Sumatra have their teeth filed into points. This is said to make them more attractive to men. The local shaman bangs away at the teeth with a knife; later, they’re chiseled into something resembling shark teeth.

6. Beatings

In parts of Brazil, it’s customary to beat women in the streets as some kind of test for marriage. The woman is kidnapped and brought out naked into the town, where she is beaten by strangers until she passes out. This, of course, often leads to death.

7. Forced tattoos

Tattoos are cool…unless you’re forced to get one. That’s what goes on in parts of Paraguay and Brazil. When girls come of age, they’re expected to get either their stomachs, breasts, or backs tattooed in order to impress a mate.

8. Breast burning

There are cultures in Cameroon, Nigeria, and South Africa that press hot stones on young women’s breasts as a way to keep them from growing. Supposedly, the reasoning behind burning the flesh off the boob is so that the women don’t encourage men to rape them. This act is often commissioned by the girl’s parents.

While in most cases, these things only happen in extreme sects of certain cultures, the fact that the rituals are still performed is disgusting. What’s worse, if the women speak out about them, they are perceived as betraying their people.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/women-rituals/

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The week in patriarchy: Trump clearly doesn’t understand health insurance

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If you dont realize by now that a total clown is in charge, nothing is going to change that. At least its Friday

If you want to be able to sleep this weekend, do yourself a favor and dont read the New York Times expansive interview with Donald Trump. The president makes little sense as he answers questions about everything from Russia to Jeff Sessions and healthcare and if you were already worried about whose hands the country is in, this piece will not put your mind at ease. For example, it seems pretty evident that the president of the United States has no idea how health insurance works.

I used to see interviews like this and be a bit pleased because the more coverage of Trumps stupidity the better. But if you dont realize by now that a total clown is in charge, theres no interview or expose thats going to change that. So join me this week in a good old fashion wallow: things are bad, the president is bad. At least its Friday.

Glass half full

Scotland just became the first nation to offer free sanitary products to low-income women. Access to tampons and pads arent just a hygiene issue but a health and rights issue. At least one country is getting it right.

What Im RTing

Amir Talai (@AmirTalai)

I read this brilliance on race and couldnt help thinking the world could really use Fran Lebowitz blogging or tweeting or something. pic.twitter.com/KLTHaZa6op

July 18, 2017

Laurie Penny (@PennyRed)

Most of the interesting women you know are far, far angrier than you’d imagine.

July 18, 2017

Renee Bracey Sherman (@RBraceySherman)

Home care workers care for families, and sometimes deal with abuse, sexual assault, and only get paid $10 an hour. https://t.co/P6oream4xT pic.twitter.com/TNzJJn1HwK

July 20, 2017

Planned Parenthood (@PPact)

.@ppfa & @ReproRights are suing Texas over its latest abortion ban. Politicians make bad doctorshttps://t.co/zRfjG51i5t #WeWontGoBack pic.twitter.com/wmksAUMYmm

July 20, 2017

Who Im reading

Soraya Nadia Mcdonald on R Kelly and the truth behind why he hasnt been held accountable for his abuse we just dont care about black women; Daniel Kibblesmith with a humourous but way too real take on the expectation that Hillary Clinton disappear from public life; and ProPublicas incredible investigation into maternal deaths in the United States.

What Im watching

How Fox News is trying to normalize collusion. Oh good.

How outraged I am

I was already at a ni ne out of 10 over Betsy Devos listening to anti-women rape deniers, and this first person account at Vox from a sexual assault survivor put me at a full 10.

How Im making it through this week

A golden retriever in Long Island rescued a baby deer from drowning and Ive watched it at least 15 times.

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Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/21/the-week-in-patriarchy-trump-clearly-doesnt-understand-health-insurance

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