Tag Archives: family

25 Parenting Hacks Every New Mom Or Dad Should Definitely Know

Just under 4 million babies are born in the U.S. each year. That means that some 8 million parents welcome a new child into the world.

And as those parents know, raising a kid is not an easy job. There are sleepless nights, stressful days, diaper changes, crying…the list goes on. As your little ones grow up, new challenges arise. That’s why it’s so important to have an edge.

Take it from moms and dads who have been parents many times over — this insider knowledge is sure to make things easier on just about any new mother or father.

1. Prevent your kid’s toys from floating away in the tub with an old laundry basket.

2. Make a DIY sparkler hand protector out of a Solo cup.

3. Change the bottle game by enabling your tot to feed themselves.

4. Use a rubber band to teach your kids how to hold a pencil and write properly.

5. Use disposable coffee cup tops to prevent messy popsicle drips.

6. If your kids are afraid of monsters, spray their room with “Monster Spray.”

7. Turn cleanup time into a fun game.

8. Freeze Capri Sun overnight to make a delicious slushy.

9. Give your kid a sweet playpen by inflating a pool indoors.

10. Put padlocks on plugs so there’s no risk of your little tykes playing with them.

11. Once your baby learns to crawl, put them in this adorable onesie — they’ll mop while they explore.

12. Use a shoe organizer as a storage spot in your car.

13. All you need is a strong sheet and a table to make a baby-friendly indoor hammock.

14. An old camera bag can work as a new diaper bag.

15. Use an old phone to make a monitor for your baby’s crib.

16. Give your baby some shade and shield them from nasty bug bites by putting a crib sheet over their outdoor playpen.

17. Disposable sauce containers are a great place to store pacifiers.

18. Keep kids from making a mess while they eat in the car by bringing along shower totes.

19. Use an old lotion bottle to make an easy water balloon pump.

20. Fill a glove with beans to make it seem like you are holding your little one while they sleep.

21. Make an awesome faucet extender with an old shampoo or body wash bottle.

22. A large cardboard box can turn any stairway into a slide.

23. This little hat will prevent tears while you bathe your baby.

24. Let your kids know exactly how much toilet paper they should be using.

25. And finally, for when you’ve got teens…use this trick to alert you if they try to sneak in after curfew.

(via WooHome)

Hopefully, these hacks will make your transition into parenthood a bit smoother. But above all, just enjoy the ride!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/parenting-hacks/

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A moment that changed me: finding out that my dad was an Auschwitz baby | Namalee Bolle

The discovery that my real grandparents died in the Holocaust helped me understand my father and made me determined to help others, says artist and writer Namalee Bolle

Mum was sombre as she spoke, so I knew it was serious. Shes not the kind of mother who is unsmiling very often so when she is, its deeply unsettling. Her kind almond eyes were intense as she became the storyteller of the kind of drama you go to the movies for.

Oma is not your real grandmother. In 1943 she pretended Dad was her own baby that she lost in a miscarriage. She risked her life and saved your dad from the Nazis. Her voice became quieter as she told the family secret.

Your grandad handed Dad to her in the middle of the night with tears streaming down his face and never returned. Your real grandparents were Jews who died in Auschwitz.

As a 16-year-old teenager I was at my wits end about my erratic, volatile dad but suddenly it all made perfect sense. His rages, panic attacks and severe depression only seemed to worsen as the years went by, and he had an awful debilitating lung condition from which he struggled to breathe. Sometimes he was lovely comedic with a weird Dutch sense of humour that had us in stitches, but fun Dad didnt last long before he became gloomy Dad again.

Intuitively I knew in my heart he loved us and I tried to reach out to him, but it was monumentally challenging because I was still a child, and he was psychologically abusive to me and my younger sister whom I was ferociously protective of. Our home felt like a war zone where Shirani and I were fighting for our own survival, against our father.

My grandparents names were Leo and Hildegard Denneboom. My dads name was originally Leo too, but he was renamed Hans Bolle and grew up in Amsterdam. Jacoba Bolle, Dads heroic second mother, was married to Max Bolle, but he died of a heart attack when Dad was only 17.

Years later I would discover psychosomatic connections between unhealed grief and respiratory problems, but I know Dad wouldnt have listened. He was in denial of the root cause of his problems and refused help. It was as if he felt he deserved to suffer for still being alive. I believe this survivors guilt is what eventually led to his own death five years ago this summer, four years after his adoptive mother Jacoba died at 96.

Hans
Intuitively I knew in my heart he loved us . Hans Bolle. Photograph: Namalee Bolle

What dad really needed was a therapist like Dr Viktor Frankl, inventor of logotherapy, who was a Holocaust survivor himself, as documented in his brilliant book Mans Search for Meaning. Frankls existential method was highly relatable to our situation and he inspired me to train as a psychotherapist myself.

I didnt start to fully acknowledge I was a second generation Holocaust survivor until I was in my late 20s and well into my fashion career, having cofounded my own magazine SUPERSUPER! The ultra-bright, relentlessly positive tone and hyper-colourful styling were in fact born of coping mechanisms of growing up with the overarching burden of death and my dads colossal pessimism about his past. I also became aware of epigenetic inheritance the transferral of trauma through DNA that makes it more likely for me to be affected by stress so I learned mindfulness meditation and reiki to self-soothe and protect myself.

Dad simply did not know how to stop the pain spilling out of him and into us. He was tortured by his past and had no tools for dealing with it as emotional difficulties and mental health problems were not something a man felt comfortable admitting to at the time. Without the unconditional love of my incredible mother I do not believe he would have lasted as long as he did. I have thought endlessly about my grandmothers altruism in helping a baby in need while putting herself in grave danger. Thanks to her I would not think twice about adopting a child.

The discovery of my true background has given me the deepest awareness to search with tremendous empathy when determining the link between PTSD and the mental and physical symptoms it creates. Now I am going to honour my family and our bittersweet tale by helping others with their healing too.

Namalee Bolle is an artist and writer with a background in fashion and creative direction. Winner of the Guardian Jackie Moore award for fashion journalism, she was also fashion director for Sleazenation, co-founder of SUPERSUPER! magazine and has contributed to I-D, the Evening Standard and Vogue

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/11/a-moment-that-changed-me-mum-dad-auschwitz-baby

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What fathers do

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Some fathers do these things.

Some fathers go to the Columbus Public Library used book sale in about 1980 and buy five big boxes of books on every topic. They place those books in a playroom and they result in a consistently relevant personal library for his kids. Every year they learn something new out of that room.

Some fathers take their sons and daughters to Computer Express, a small computer shop, after taking you to Radio Shack and Sun TV and deciding the prices there are too high. Some fathers help you decide on an Atari 800XL with tape drive and they buy you River Raid to go with it.

Some fathers buy you a modem and let you call BBSes all night.

They take you to Boy Scouts and help you win the local Pinewood Derby. They drive you to Bell Labs where you learn UNIX and shell scripting.

Some fathers sit with you and type in programs out of the back of ANTIC Magazine.

They convince the family it wants a dog and picks a special breed, a Kerry Blue Terrier, because it doesnt shed.

They get drunk at the Sheraton hotel bar happy hour and fall out of the car and turn you off alcohol until late in college. Thats when you really find you have a taste for it.

Some fathers help you with your science fair projects and explore wind power with you by making balsa wood models of various generators.

Some fathers give you phone wire, broken stereos, and a soldering iron and tell you to experiment. You do. Some fathers have a garage full of tools and show you how to cut wood and fix brakes and listen to NPR on a broken radio.

Some fathers buy you a Packard Bell 286 and help you learn programming.

Some fathers leave a basket of vinyl in the basement and in it you find Dylan, the Stones, and Janis Joplin, thereby making you the least pop-culturally-aware high schooler in Columbus.

Some fathers work for 40 years at the same boring job to pay for a house and food.

Some fathers take you to Europe and show you the magic of travel. They buy you Mad Magazine in German.

They take you to Mad Magazines offices in Manhattan where you meet Dick DiBartolo, Nick Meglin, and Bill Gaines. That could inspire you to be a writer.

They marvel at your new novel, The Tale of the White Worm, you write when youre twelve. They edit your school essays and, one night, they write an entire research paper about The Crucible for you because youre sick.

Some fathers drive you from college to college looking for the right one. Then some fathers come drive you back from the right college every summer because you dont have a car.

Some fathers help you sell your car when you move to Poland for work.

Some fathers come to your wedding in Warsaw.

They Skype you almost every day, leaving cryptic messages and posting links from Craigslist. Some fathers listen to Rush Limbaugh all day because hes a pleasant distraction.

Some fathers drive twelve hours to visit you in Brooklyn.

Some fathers get grumpy.

Some fathers still make you laugh.

Some fathers get lung cancer.

Some fathers make you scared.

Their failing health encourages you to run again and quit drinking because watching a man who looks so much like you get sick is frightening. But it also encourages you to reconnect with him.

I know: Some fathers beat you. Some fathers leave you. Some fathers die early. Some fathers are cruel. Some fathers die inside.

But some of us get lucky.

Some fathers are great. Some fathers are kind. Some fathers educate, expand, and elucidate. Some fathers give all.

Some of us get lucky.

Happy Fathers Day.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/18/what-fathers-do/

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